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3Litres12Cylinders

Winged death machines, flat-tops, dreadnoughts, grey wolves, sharks of steel, nuclear weapons and a dab of space related content from time to time.

hanspanzer:

P-35 abatiendo un Zero.

helghasttactician:

Streaking into the night sky, a Su-27 rips apart the night with fully lit afterburners. The armament of the Su-27 consists primarily of air-to-air weaponry, though later variants of the -27 could carry air-to-ground weaponry. Typical air superiority loadout of an Su-27 would be six R-27s and two R-73s. (Photo)

toocatsoriginals:

F/A-18F Super Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron VFA-102 on the aircraft carrier USS George Washington - June 2, 2014.

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Benjamin K. Kittleson

via Department of Defense

akphotos:

#avgeek #aviation #pilot #AIRCRAFT #flying #pilot #nikon #retro #vintage #photography #nikon

martinlkennedy:

From A Ladybird ‘Achievements’ Book: Exploring Space (Revised Edition), series ‘601.’ Originally published in 1964, this edition updated in the late 1960s. Illustrated by B. Knight and B.H. Robinson.

colchrishadfield:

Over Parliament with the RCAF Snowbirds. Very proud to fly the flag high today.

toocatsoriginals:

Ever Wonder Why U.S.Army Helicopters Have Native American Names (Mostly…)?
From Army Aviation Digest - March 1977 - Contest to Name the UH-60, Which Would Become the Blackhawk:
AR 70-28, dated 18 June 1976, specifies that Army aircraft should be given the names of American Indian tribes or chiefs or terms. The name should appeal to the imagination without sacrifice of dignity, and should suggest an aggressive spirit and confidence in the capabilities of the aircraft. The name also should suggest mobility, agility, flexibility, firepower and endurance.For brevity, it is suggested the name consist of only one word. The names given Army aircraft are primarily for use in public releases and other documents as a ready reference but have proven popular among Army personnel. In the past some Army aircraft, such as the 0-1 Bird Dog and OH-23 Ravenwere not given Indian names. In most cases, such aircraft were given their names before the present policy went into effect. These names have not been changed. The last aircraft introduced into the Army without an Indian name is the AH-1G HueyCobra. This aircraft, an outgrowth of the UH-1 Iroquois (Huey), was named by its maker before it was purchased by the Army. When the Army started buying the helicopter the name quickly was shortened by common usage to ” Cobra,” which is descriptive of its impressive fighting ability. The names of fixed and rotary wing Army aircraft are listed below.
ROTARY WINGAH-1 HueyCobraOH-13 SiouxCH-21 ShawneeOH-23 RavenCH-34 ChoctawOH-58 KiowaCH-37 MojaveTH-55 OsageCH-47 ChinookUH-1 IroquoisCH-54 TarheUH-19 ChickasawOH-6 CayuseAH-56 Cheyene
Now you know… and knowing is half the battle.
via The Aviationist

toocatsoriginals:

Ever Wonder Why U.S.Army Helicopters Have Native American Names (Mostly…)?

From Army Aviation Digest - March 1977 - Contest to Name the UH-60, Which Would Become the Blackhawk:

AR 70-28, dated 18 June 1976, specifies that Army aircraft should be given the names of American Indian tribes or chiefs or terms. The name should appeal to the imagination without sacrifice of dignity, and should suggest an aggressive spirit and confidence in the capabilities of the aircraft. The name also should suggest mobility, agility, flexibility, firepower and endurance.For brevity, it is suggested the name consist of only one word. The names given Army aircraft are primarily for use in public releases and other documents as a ready reference but have proven popular among Army personnel. In the past some Army aircraft, such as the 0-1 Bird Dog and OH-23 Ravenwere not given Indian names. In most cases, such aircraft were given their names before the present policy went into effect. These names have not been changed. The last aircraft introduced into the Army without an Indian name is the AH-1G HueyCobra. This aircraft, an outgrowth of the UH-1 Iroquois (Huey), was named by its maker before it was purchased by the Army. When the Army started buying the helicopter the name quickly was shortened by common usage to ” Cobra,” which is descriptive of its impressive fighting ability. The names of fixed and rotary wing Army aircraft are listed below.

ROTARY WING
AH-1 HueyCobra
OH-13 Sioux
CH-21 Shawnee
OH-23 Raven
CH-34 Choctaw
OH-58 Kiowa
CH-37 Mojave
TH-55 Osage
CH-47 Chinook
UH-1 Iroquois
CH-54 Tarhe
UH-19 Chickasaw
OH-6 Cayuse
AH-56 Cheyene

Now you know… and knowing is half the battle.

via The Aviationist

nucleargearing:

X-15B on 4 Titan I Boosters

North American Aviation

1958

North American Aviation had a plan to get an American framed as the first Man in Space by stripping an X-15A, adding advanced heat shields, and attaching boosters to the aft to achieve a single 120 x 75 km orbit. Other boosters included the Saturn I and a modified Navaho rocket.

Kuznetsov beach

(Source)

tkohl:

"Long live Stalin’s aviation!"

historicaltimes:

Dr. von Braun briefs President Eisenhower at the front of the S1 Stage of the Saturn 1 vehicle at the Marshall Space Flight Center, September 8 1960

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